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Dr. Lawrence W. Evers

 

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Dr. Lawrence W. Evers, 2007

Dr. Lawrence W. Evers

Dr. Lawrence W. Evers, 2004

Photos below of some of Dr Evers students

Dr. Lawrence W. Evers and students

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A Legacy of Action:
Dr. Lawrence W. Evers

Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Lawrence W. Evers was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin and raised on a farm outside of Oshkosh.  He joined the army and studied electronics of the Nike Ajax guided missile in ElPaso, Texas.  Upon completion of the school, he was assigned to stay as an instructor. 

With the GI Bill in hand, he started in the mechanical engineering program at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.  When Miss Wright came along they were married between the sophomore and junior years.  They both graduated in 1961, Carol in Chemistry, and Larry in Mechanical Engineering.  They stayed in Madison one more year so that Larry could earn a Master's Degree in Nuclear Engineering. 

After that they went to east Tennessee, where Larry worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  After several years and the birth of two children, they moved to Combustion Engineering in Windsor Connecticut and later to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he worked in the Rex Chainbelt Research Center.  After a few years, he became a teacher at the Milwaukee School of Engineering.  Larry earned a PhD in Mechanical Engineering at University of Wisconsin in Madison.  Carol earned a degree in pharmacy.  For his research he studied emissions from internal combustion engines.
After earning the doctorate Larry went to Bartlesville, Oklahoma, where he worked for the U.S. government in an engine research facility.  Larry says "It didn't take long to remember the joys of being a teacher."

So in 1978, the Evers family moved 1500 miles north, further north then we had ever been.  He says: "We knew it would be an adventure, but we did not know that the winter of 1978 - 1979 would be a record snowfall of 30 feet.  Who knew that the end of the Rainbow was buried in a snow bank?"

Larry taught for 25 years at Michigan Tech., with retirement in 2003. During that time he says that he had approximately 3,000 to 4,000 students in his classes.  Larry says, "I tried to learn their names.  Time has caused many of the names to slip away.  Yet, to know them and help them has been a joy."

Generally, he taught in the energy, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer areas.  Some of the course areas that he taught at all levels: Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, Internal Combustion Engines, Power Engineering, and Internal Combustion Engine Laboratory.

Larry says that "Over the years I graduated 43 Masters and PhD students.  These students were fun to guide and help through the twists and turns of a research project.  Industrial companies sponsored most of these students.  They learned to satisfy the needs of the sponsors and the academic requirements.  Their efforts brought in over $2,000,000 to the Michigan Tech research programs.  Some of the graduate students have their names on the four Patents that we share."

 " What is most gratifying is the sense that in general the students here at Michigan Tech appreciated my effort in their behalf.  I have been told that I picked up the nickname of 'Uncle Larry'.  I am very proud of that accomplishment."

 

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Larry and Carol Evers

Dr. Lawrence W. Evers

 

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From the Keweenawan